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combat. at the time only one in four u.s. bombers in missions over germany came home safely. >> mayhem was a bomb dore who escaped from the prison camp run by naziicism thosing prison guards. >> they slipped on lois infested straws and sowage in the area and solitary confinement and starvation and mental terror. >> a historic injustice was reversed. the eight remaining survivors out of the pow's imprisonned in switzerland were honored by the air force. >> it is the kind of courage we read about in books. their stories would not have been known without dwight ma er whose grandfather was imprisonned in the prison camp. >> to have it denied and irrespectivee?'Ñ of the treatm did not so many right. >> congress revised a 1985 law on pow medals and requiring prisoners to be held in enemy territory. lieutenant was moved. his son patrick accompanied him to the ceremony. >> every day for the rest of his life was a gift. he was never in a bad mood. >> that attitude and the grandsons pursuit of justice is the reason they finally received the recognition they were denied more than cent years. in
and others. and in germany. >> family members are outraged. they were hurt that these support centers are closing in by a jenning but at some point, an airline has to say, we don't have any more information, right, we have to do this or is this timing particularly bad? >> well, the timing is particularly bad because there is still for the answers where their loved ones are. but in most air crash accidents, certainly all the ones i have worked on, the airline usually closes down its support system and they have a care team assigned member assigned to each family. they cut that off at about day 45 and that's pretty standard and the reason is, that is in most cases, the case is moving on to a different stage, here because they don't have a plane or their loved ones, it's particularly bad timing. it's not unusual to close it down about this point. >> oh, boy, thanks so much to both of you. appreciate it. >> already. the other woman in this clipper owners scandal is talking. what she told barra walters about her relationship with donald sterling and whether she thinks she a racist. first,
stallone and timbers took the italian stallion to europe and after a successful two-year run in germany -- >> this is show number 56. did you know that? >> oh, my gosh. >> reporter: "rocky" is on broadway. >> still feels like we just recently opened. it's great. the set's still, like -- i guess looking kind of run down as it's supposed to. this is rocky's apartment right here. >> reporter: at 35 alex timbers is already a veteran of broadway drawing a claim for shows ranging from "bloody bloodsy andrew jackson" to the pee-wee herman show. still, timbers was an underdog to lead rocky's revival. when you were diving into this project, had you seen the "rocky" movies? >> no i hadn't seen it. >> reporter: how did you do that? how did you come prepared if you hadn't seen the movie? >> an asset. treat the script by a dramatic text. spent pictures pulling this is what boxers look like what philadelphia looks like. i came in and said, this is what my version of "rocky" based on your script would be. >> reporter: this week "rocky" was nominated for four tony a awards including
it was no longer really necessary. we used to say germany was surrounded by friends and everything is wonderful. obviously we need to take a fresh look because o'land is our immediate neighbor, part of our club, our union, and pole -- pollland has a bored irwith ukraine and if there's chaos in ukraine and beyond it affects our very own security and that of all of nate at the and the i as well. so, yes, i think there must be a comprehensive review of our priorities, both in the e.u. and in nato, but let's not do it, if i may say so with foaming at the mouth. let's do it cool, and let's do it also, always, in -- with having in mind consistency. >> on that thought we're going to questions from the audience. if you just briefly give your name and affiliation. you know the rule, a question, not a statement. >> thank you. from george washington university. we talked about in april of 2008 the nato summit decided to not extend membership action to ukraine and georgia, and within four months georgia was invaded. with hindsight, the word wisdom has been subpoena number of times today. is it your view th
gang. at that time president meeting with germany chancellor took another shot at russian leader putin. >> washington can't be taken into account is mr. putin suggestion both through words and action that he has the right to violate the solve republic ty of another country. that's not acceptable. ix hear open the streets anger aimed at the united states we asked this pro russian leader who he blames for the violence. his answer doesn't need any translation. >> america. >> it's not clear what kind of violence will provoke 0response from russian a.spokesman says putin is being kept informed of the unfolding events there and regards the swi quote grave concern. so stay tune we'll see what happens next. >> at least 350 people are dead and thousands more missing tonight. following a major land slide in afghanistan. days of heavy rain trigger the slide that buried 300 homes in remote area of northeast afghanistan. the rest of the village evacuated because of concerns there will be more moving mud. rescue crew are lacking for people still trapped in the rubble but officials say they don'
's not viable to put this promoted boxing box at this site >> other comment, however, elsie street. 15 germany rad street. please step forward and good evening ladies and gentlemen, i'm the owner of the house on germany rad street i want to dmrar any petition in mounting the facility at that place i won of the my objection the at&t cabinet would be an eye soar and attract bad things. the 415 germany rad street the at&t cabinet will pose an undue burden on the prove or disprove. the at&t cabinet are inhabit the enlarging and existing at the curbside. the at&t cabinet will cabinet will change the residential air to a more commercial area. the at&t cabinet will disturb the function of the adjacent property. i don't think the big company like at&t should be louder than the minority. ladies and gentlemen, i hope you consider this situation and here's the copy of the letter i first sent to the at&t and department of public works for your again to reference. please we see my statements and thank you very much. >> would you like to state your name for the record. >> and i less than lee. this is the f
, and energy. germany relies on russian energy, but merkel agreed to this to include it as long as her country's inevitable economic pain is shared with other countries. now, today's little meeting with president and merkel didn't go so well, apparently. the president still walking on egg shells over the whole nsa revelation that the u.s. spied on chancellor merkel. asked whether somehow she has trust that has been rebuilt with the president, she dodged simply saying, we have a few difficulties yet to overcome. lester? >> chuck todd tonight at the white house. thanks. >>> house speaker john boehner began appointing a committee today to investigate the september 11, 2012, attack on the u.s. diplomatic post in benghazi, libya, that killed four americans including u.s. ambassador chris stevens. and separately the republican chairman of the house oversight committee, darrell issa, subpoenaed secretary of state john kerry to testify about the administration's response to the attack. skipping the usual step of issuing an official invitation to appear. a release of internal white house e-mails with n
merkel, chancellor of germany is visiting today. the most productive country in europe. 40% of young people in apprenticeship programs. it has no minimum wage. in fact, if you look at western europe as a group, the countries that have a minimum wage have 13.8% unemployment. the countries with no minimum wage, and these are, by the way, higher income countries. these are norway, sweden, austria, germany. they have 6.3% unemployment. what's wrong with this country? here are countries that say we're going to be economically productive. they have half the unemployment rate of the countries that have a social welfare state. what am i missing here? >> one, i lived in england for two years. i know great britain and know europe very well. what you're missing is they have a safety net, first of all. they have universal health care. day have -- young people have access to education. cost of housing is much lower. their governments ensure that there's a minimum standard of living and, in fact, the unemployment compensation is there for them. in fact -- >> i'm going to shock you, too. i think ca
, germany, brazil. who have used columbine as an inspiration. and it's all that publicity that columbine got. the columbine killers they decided they wanted to feel important. and they sought revenge. revenge against their classmates who bullied them. maybe against all of society. and it seems to me that is the motive in this case, as well. >> i know -- i know it's revenge, i know a lot of it is notoriety. how could one not know about columbine even if you were a kid when that happened? i've heard a lot of folks say we, the media, we the public shouldn't be uttering the suspects' names because that then, of course, raises them to a level and elevates them to a level we shouldn't be doing. but do you think that would take away, you know, and some of these other potential school shooters' minds. the troubled minds, the intent to kill? >> first of all, the reporters have a duty to tell the public. and also, the idea of making them into big shot celebrities, putting them on the cover of celebrity magazines. but keep in mind that the copycat factor is inspired by all of this attention. during the
about because he was in germany at the time. >> alan? >> you don't think that members of congress will find out more information now that you can have general petraeus and hillary clinton sitting next to each other -- >> how many more investigations -- do you know in the bush administration, i know you hate when i bring up bush -- after 9/11, there were 13 different attacks at embassies and consulates resulting in hundreds of deaths. i didn't hear a word about this. why is there a double standard about this president? >> you shouldn't be afraid of the truth. and if this investigation, this select committee can uncover the truth, then you should welcome it and let the chips fall where they may. listen, krauthammer is right. think about the people that went to jail over covering up a third-rate burglary at the watergate building in washington, d.c. four people died. it's a very big deal. >> benghazi is a tragedy, it's not a scandal. >> oh, it's a scandal. >> when we learn more information with the select committee. >>> extreme weather has wreaked havoc over the u.s. the past few day
? >> stand by. jim, how much distance, daylight, is there between the u.s. and germany on the imp sigs of sanctions? >> clearly enough to keep the real sector sanctions. really the step that's going to make a difference and impose a real economic price on russia and we saw that difference in the last week when you had the obama administration seemingly teeing up harder sanctions than they were able to deliver when announced earlier this week. but two, the u.s. administration has made clear that they're holding those sanctions for the event that russian troops roll across the border into ukraine and they'll make the point we need that step, we need to impose some sort of price. the trouble is, that lays out the possibility for what's happening now, which is in effect, the stealth invasion. russian directed separatists taking over cities and towns causing disruption, shooting down helicopters. it's a real problem. >> the u.s. has made the point, administration officials make the point over and over again, the unity of the united states with the european union is what's all important here
against russia clear in recent weeks. as a result, germany's position is unlikely to shift, barring a dramatic escalation of the conflict in ukraine. we will hear from chancellor merkel and president obama. in the meantime, a washington journal discussion this morning on the effectiveness of sanctions. host: our friday roundtable focusing on the issue of sanctions as a foreign-policy tool, do they work? carla anne robbins is a senior fellow at the council on foreign relations. mark dubowitz of the foundation for democracy. "the wall street journal" the president meets with angela merkel. german companies opposing sanctions, can you explain. guest: german companies opposed sanctions against iran, it is no surprise they are opposing sanctions against russia. the german corporate lobby is very strong. it is no surprise. it is a very strong economic relationship between germany and russia. including former german chancellor, who is making a lot of money helping natural gas flow from russia to germany. no surprise. angela merkel is under pressure. host: one of the fundamental flaws of sa
, to the white house. germany is one of our strongest allies, and angela is one of my closest partners. with her indulgence, i want to start by making two brief comments. first, as president, my top priority is doing everything that we can to create more jobs and opportunity for hard-working families, for our economic strength is a source of strength in the world. this morning we learned that our business has created 273,000 new jobs last month. all told our businesses have now created 9.2 million new jobs over 50 consecutive months of job growth. the grit and determination of the american people are moving us forward, but we have to keep a relentless focus on job creation and creating more opportunities for working families. there's plenty more that congress should be doing, from raising the minimum wage to creating good construction jobs, rebuilding america. and i want to work with them wherever i can, but i keep acting on my own wherever i must to make sure every american who works hard has the chance to get ahead. second point, i also want to say on behalf of the american people that our tho
and on this issue, of course, of ukraine. it is also important to note that germany has a lot of economic ties with russia, and the question is whether you put more economic pressure on that country and actually affect the economic relations between germany and russia. so, a lot to think about here especially since big german companies, volkswagen to name one, have a huge stake in russia. and the more pressure you put on, the harder it is for those companies to continue to do business very well and thrive, carol. >> joe johns reporting live from the white house this morning. thank you. >>> still to come in the "newsroom," tensions flare and ukraine's military mobilizes. we'll look at a new offensive that could push the country closer to widespread fighting. [announcer] play close-good and close. help keep teeth clean and breath fresh with beneful healthy smile food. with special crunchy kibbles and great taste, it's a happy way to a healthy smile. beneful healthy smile food and snacks. the average person will probably eat something or drink something that is acidic on a daily basis. those acid
back to al jazeera america. >>> ahead in this half hour, exploring germany's roll, with angela merkel getting ready to meet at the whitehouse. >> why the controversy in brunai. >> we will focus on a medicalmist affecting a lot of kids. a physical illness causing what you see here, children exhibiting psychologistic behavior almost overnight. but first, let's check our top stories. violence e rurupting as ukraini forces crack down. the country's defense minister saying soldiers were killed when their helicopters were shot down. vladimir putin said it keeills y hope of keeping hope alive. >> police say 17-year-old john david ladieu was planning to kill his parents and sister and attack the heights. they were tipped off when someone saw him entering a storage unit. they found a journal detailing plans as well as weapons. >> john kerry set to meet with south sudan's president in an effort to end the civil war. he is urging both sides to stop the violence and is threatening sanctions on south sudan easy leaders. thousands have been killed because of the fighting and those supporting former
. it is a very strong economic relationship between germany and russia. including former german chancellor, who is making a lot of money helping natural gas flow from russia to germany. no surprise. angela merkel is under pressure. host: one of the fundamental flaws of sanctions as a foreign-policy tool? guest: it is limited and a blunt instrument but also there is no other choice. not a lot of other alternatives. politics are flawed, too. germany is russia's's largest trading partner in the eu. they have more economic interest in the u.s. and its owing to be hard to pressure russia and a major way unless the europeans are willing to play. host: let me share what jack lew told members of congress when it came to sanctions and at russia and the wealthy individuals linked to president putin. [video clip] >> if you look at the impact on russia's economy, it is misleading to look at what happens day by day. you have to look over the period of time since russia went into crimea and since we have imposed sanctions. there has been a substantial deterioration in rush's already weak economy. we see and
russian president putin told germany's chancellor that ukraine should withdraw its military from the eastern and southern parts of the country. president obama will meet with german chancellor angela merkel later today. >>> alarming news about greenhouse gases on our planet. new tests show the level of caon dioxide in our atmosphere is now at its highest in human history. one scientist told the san francisco chronicle, it is time to stop building things with tail pipes and smokestacks. >>> here they are. horses and jockeys getting ready for this weekend's kentucky derby. an unpredictable field this year. almost anybody could win in the two-minute race. prerace coverage begins at noon eastern, 9:00 pacific on nbc sports network. don't miss race coverage beginning at 4:00 p.m. eastern, 1:00 pacific, here on nbc. >>> in health news, a problem that keeps millions of americans up all night. now the fda approved a new pacemaker like device to treat sleep apnea. it happens when throat and tongue muscles relax blocking airwaves. the implant keep the air ways open by zapping them with an
from eastern ukraine being critical to de-escalate that. you andst met preferred, germany, we were covering a story for the european central bank. chancellor merkel speaks to present obama today. and they have a press conference. what will europe want to hear from chancellor merkel? will want what kiev to hear from chancellor merkel is that they are not going to hold back from further sanctions or any other action on russia after the latest exclamation -- escalation. of course for its part, russia is blaming ukraine, saying they sent a convoy in order to negotiate the release of the eight monitors who were captured by pro-russian separatists earlier. so i think what the ukraine wants to hear is that there is no stepping back, that they are ready to continue to back them on this. right heather, yesterday vladimir putin effectively told erchnof ofchurch an pull back. how are they reacting to that statement in kiev? are think people in kiev very much on amused by what putin has said after what happened here. it is pretty much business as usual, but they are obviously behind the govern
. and russians went into east germany in '53. they went into hungary in '56. they went into prague in '68. we were always very careful. they have 1700 nuclear weapons. >> but it wasn't arming those countries that led to tend of the cold war and the collapse of the soviet union. >> a very long-term collapse. >> it was economic. >> we need to be thinking about a 20-year plan to be dealing with putin. >> yes. >> not a 20-week plan. >> i would tend to agree with you on that. and i don't understand why if this is true, and i appreciate your perspective, where are the republicans who are willing to play this longer game with this president? you talk about how weak this president. i don't think this president looks week to al qaeda. i don't think this president looks weak to moammar gadhafi. i think america looks weak when the republican party attacks this president when he goes for peace, when he goes for war, when he tries to do overseas, stuff at home. where is the one area you are willing to work with this president on? >> first thing i said we had to go, look at this strategically and we have t
-0 win in germany giving them every reason to celebrate as their club aims to win the title for the tenth time. >> i think that there is a lot of experience for this kind of game. it really doesn't matter who will be the team. it's important that one of the teams is real madrid. >> interested in buying the l.a. clippers after owner donald sterling was banned for life. but first he has other things to deal with. mayweather is going into the fight with a flawless 45-0 record which includes 26 knockouts. >> the key to the match today is just being very, very intelligent, being very, very smart, taking my time, keeping my composure and coming up with brilliant game plans. >> and mark cavendish has won his third stage win in turkey. officials had to stop riders on a dissent after a serious of crashes in wet conditions. cavendish prevailed after the restart in a sprint finish. but he holds an over all six-second lead. >>> it's still 0-0 at stanford bridge in that semifinal. >> it will decide how many buses chelsea decided to park, two last week. indeed, that's all for us at this news howe. we h
.s. army air force crash landing in switzerland during bombing over germany are being awarded the prisoner of war metal. only eight are still alive. the men were initially held at a camp, but they tried to escape they were transferred to the prisoner of war camp in switzerland, which was run by the nazi. they were kept in unsanitary conditions, had little to eat, slept on straw and rated with numerous diseases. bill: molly, something changed to the policy in order for these medal to be awarded. it came with great effort to make sure the record was straightened out. reporter: absolutely, bill. they saw this as an injustice and did some research on the prison camp in u.s. law governing prisoners of war medals. a history professor at west point fought for the change. making a point they were as much of a prisoner of war camp in switzerland and not germany or japan. on behalf of his late grandfather who was a pilot. saying in a statement of the men held in switzerland, i thought it was important to overturn the dishonorable stigma on their service. all of my family is extremely proud of what m
. germa germany seem siemens isn't accepting that bid. >> reporter: they can solicit unsolicited bids. to that end, siemens is ready to sweeten an earlier bid, offering to swap some not all of the power assets along with cash. they called ge's offer compelling, alstom has untildown kd 2nd to make a decision. it would then seek approval of the company shareholders as well as the labor board. alstoms largest expects if offer. if approved it will immediately add to the companyings earnings eight to ten cents a share. it will mean that 75% of ge's operating mar jens will come from its industrial operations by 2016. that's important because it's targeted 70% of margins from industrial operations. so that allows it to exceed that goal. it sees $1.2 billion in cost savings. the therm am renewables and businesses would be the biggest acquisition of the ceo's 13.5 year tenure. in a statement. they say it furthers ge's strategy of expanding into industrial businesses leak power and water. now, when news of the ge bid first leaked, alstom is considered an industrial treasure. politicians were al
back to the history books and what things were like in germany before world world war with the sense of them being a rising power but with the grievance that they would soon be into position to correct in some way. now that doesn't mean conflict is inevitable but the decisions over the maritime disputes you felt the chance of to improve. >> the trip i took in march was my 9th trip there. and it was a great quote that i would like to point out from a debate from two people of letters. i will not go into their names. they were arguing about china and one was living there for a couple years and there other returned. and the guy who had not said the guy who lived there was too close to china and the guy responded surely there is a medium between never -- living in china versus never being there at all. that guy had never been there at all. i can tell you every time i go i learn how much i don't know and how much is changing in china. i would be concerned about china's economic rise if it doesn't happen. and that is because the imperative i think from the comm commonnist party is if they
% russian energy goes to europe. a lot of their business is in england, germany. trade is very important. russia is a very important european partner. enough.did not go far i found it interesting that the targeted people who were racking upvolved in those protests, those people in donetsk. i do not imagine those people are really shaking in their boots. it is an important gesture. i do not know how far it will go. an important person on both minister,he prime deputy prime minister, who is allegedly responsible for the theren takeover, although are other people responsible who were sanctioned. these are very important gestures. i am a huge fan of sanctions. i think they go much further than that. it seems there is evidence that russian businesses are going to suffer from the sanctions. although we now hear that it is way back to 1949, where you have your of the doing america's bidding and whatnot. and trade forces are the most forceful measure to deal with this. >> it was only a few weeks ago that we had this agreement between the ukraine and geneva and the u.s.. has anybody tried to foll
there. third, the largest supply of natural gas going into germany, and other eurtugal countries, they can't handle the tough sanctions if russia puts a stop to their natural gas. forthhough poland and so is tracking -- fracking a lot more. russia is the main gas supplier. we have to learn how to trade with them. of the gasesng rid from syria. they are trying to help. buy people with uneven vinegar. congress is thinking the old , back in theods 50's and 60's. it is a different time now. we are doing trade with china. but we are not doing anything with russia. they are the second strongest power in the world, and they could nuke us right off the planet. steve, what are you proposing, then? more diplomatic outreach with russia? more trade? caller: give the more say so in the g-8. wantger trade ties that we in the far east. things they want in europe and so forth. it is basic math and principles. let me bounce a few things off of you from what you said. here's daniel sanford. he covers russia, moscow for the bbc. he put this out. map of the day from the shell brochure. look at the m
's stronger than what france can do. it means that europe must have a strong growth everywhere, in germany, spain, uk, to go to converge to this target. >> do you think the french economy would be able to benefit from the growth from other countries? >> that's one of the targets of the plan is to say we tried to improve the company's situation and in that case, it will be both to capture the eurozone trajectory. that's the target of the government. >> phillip, when we tried to reform the french economy, there's always something funny or perhaps even worrying. the best reform in france is always the one that is not impacting myself. so french people are reluctant of the impact of the reform. >> it's mostly everywhere always the same thing. it's always better when your neighbor is changing its mind in this situation. what we see and what is important currently in france is that gdp per capita growth, it means that what you earn is what i lost. there's one winner, one loser. and that's why it's practically difficult at this moment of the cycle. that's why manuel vass ask ed, o try to make thi
speak in england or germany or france or australia, south america. people, new york, los angeles, chicago. they want to experience that admiration to american culture foreign-policy more and more, especially with the obama administration, how how heads -- how people's come out with their chins when the speak. they're very proud. tavis: i wanted to say something about the young people that you work with. people want to see their artistic efforts burgeon and grow. i want to talk specifically about the really young people. those who are school age and what you make of the fact and what you ultimately think the price will be that we will pay as a nation for not exposing these young people to the arts in the way that you were as a child and russia. you talked about earlier the fact that you were reading chekhov, you are exposed to great art. i fear personally there is a huge price this country is going to pay by denying these young people in school today access to arts programs of all sorts. what are your thoughts? art, it is such a mystery, you know? people on thee hill in washington
the tragedy of nationalcy germany -- the tragedy of nationalcy germ. let us remember the words of congressman l.a.n. troughs. he had great hope and faith that we would work to stop genocide in the future. i ask unanimous consent that the statement i just made appear at a separate place in the record than the statement i'm going to give now. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: mr. president, nevada, especially las vegas, is home to the best in the on the planet. you'll find the best performances anyplace in the world. some of the most popular performances are musicians, illusionists who entertain their audiences by making impossible scenery. they distract viewers from what they know to be true and i stead funnel their attention to something entertaining and is really fake. it seems that the republican party has decided to follow how dean knee and copperfield'fields footsteps. "the wall street journal" reported that the republican party has a newly adopted campaigning strategy, to defeat senate democrats, they're going to attacks me because they are attacks and fabrications rega
back to the history books and what things were like in germany before world war i. of germany being a rising power but with historical grievances that they would soon be in a position to correct in some way. that does not mean conflict is inevitable. the tensions over the various maritime disputes and the other you really felt the potential for increasing amounts of conflict. >> you have been following this for a long time, your thoughts? >> the trip i took in march was my night trip to china between the u.s. china working group. it was a great quote i like to point out from a debate that took place between two people of letters well known in the d c area. they were arguing about china, one had been living there for a couple years and returned and the other had not. the guy who had not said the guy who had been there was too close to china. and he could not be objective about his views and the guy responded by saying surely there is a happy medium between having lived in china and having never been there at all. that put the guy in his place, he had never been there at all. i don't
siemens of germany. >> they stepped in. >> they want to create a deal that creates to european japanese instead of ge taking over. audience withe an the french president. is he going to wear dartmouth green tights? an audience? >> with a president whose approval rating is similar to that of our own president. i think it is bizarre. >> there is breaking news. will take on it more customers. this a top headline. they will divest almost 4 million customers. charter reap -- reports earnings later. >> no more headlines this morning. what else do we have? the yankees won. >> moving onto politics, war sanctions against russia over the crisis in ukraine. president obama says the u.s. and the eu will announce them later today. he spoke after arriving in manila as part of his asia trip. forwarde going to move with an expanded list of individuals and companies that will be affected by sanctions. they remain targeted. areas ofocus on some high tech defense exports to russia. we don't think they are appropriate to be exporting in this kind of climate. military has started exercises on the ukraine bo
and germany. >> what do you think of germany? >> i like it. i have been there nine years and longest i lived anywhere. i consider germany my home in a weird way. and it's definitely a mind-opening experience for me and it's changed my perspective on a national level for the country and also on an international level as well. >> what's your favorite german word? >> oh, that's a good one. probably bergermeister. >> and the bill you want passed. >> i would go along the lines with everyone else, it seems an education bill. living in a military community i have seen the effects transferring through multiple school systems has on students and how the lack of standardization and common goals for education have on students and their futures. >> let's go back in the back here. people we have not been able to talk to. yes, sir. >> my name is daniel rose and i'm the delegate from tennessee. >> where in tennessee? >> memphis. >> the bill i would pass is definitely an immigration reform bill. just looking around the room and being able to talk to every single one of these delegates has been just an aspir
support before a possible presidential bid. >>> 6 million people killed nazi germany people are remembered. they opened a day of remembrance by issuing a stern warning of the world to learn lessons of the past and prevent another such tragedy. >> we continue to follow the deadly tornadoes and the threat is not over. one of the men overseeing search and rescue operations before he's joining us live. his warning for you coming up next. >> you better not get caught snapping selfies. we will explain. my name is jenny, and i quit smoking with chantix. before chantix, i tried to quit probably about five times. it was different than the other times i tried to quit. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix varenicline is proven to help peoe quit smoking. it's a non-nicotine pill. chantix reduced my urge to smoke. that helped me quit smoking. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking, or mood, hostility, agition, depressed mood, and suicidathoughts or actis while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these, stop chantix, and call your doctor right away.
is bigger than france, it's bigger than russia. i am confident that we will defeat germany to $4 trillion. 16 million people work in it. seven out of the 10 smartest kids in the high school graduating class work and our health care system somewhere. so when people in washington bravely talk about reforming the health care system, the degrees of difficulty or its magnitude, this is way harder than iraq. is like invading a country the size of germany, and i think that's a little bit what is happening now. the main feature of this health economy for most of the last five years has been disinflation. frankly, something no one, including the futurists predicted, in 2009 our health system arrived at a rate of increase in health spending that we haven't seen in this country since dwight eisenhower was president of the united states. five years before medicare, and we stayed at that level of maybe 3.8, 3.9% increase in spending for five long years. the economists who believe this was a product of the recession will have trouble explaining why per capita medicare spending has trended down towards
in kharkiv, germany is also condemning pro-russian militia. barnaby phillips has more from donetske in ukraine. >> the self appointed mayor, they are in no position to complain about what has happened to them. >> we are not prisoners of war. we are the guests of mayor ponomayork and treated as such. >> reporter: at least they were able to show their families they were alive and well. and later one observer from sweden was released on grounds of poor health. these men were also captured by pro-russian gunmen near slovyansk. this is how they looked after their interrogation. in the road into slovyansk, the ukrainian army. this is not a town under siege but the army is working on no more coming in. that's because the government in kyiv is very concerned at how russia will respond to any use of force by these men. in the next town, artemisk, a demonstration in favor of russia. it's a small crowd although they do seem to have some support on the sidelines. pro-russians, control the government building in donetske, they had an unexpected visitor one of russia's most wealthy men, now try
of germany from the dasm which was down 2%. and of course germany is most exposed immediately through the situation in ukraine. sanctions will perhaps hit russia. >> the energy more than anything else. >> as much as energy. germany exports an enormous of its good through russia. there's a close economic relationship. and if you start disrupting that then a major source for income for germany is being disrupted. so that's an issue. >> there's a close economic relationship. and if you start disrupting that then a major source for income for germany is but what really? s it really pay-back time as russia would like to put it because of what happened in the 90s and the collapse of the soviet union that we were allowed to go in and take over places of raugs russian strategic influence and was able to do that fairly in a cavalier way that now it's time that mr. putin says enough is enough? >> i worked in germany in that period of time. and was there in 1990 when german unification came about. and the soviet union collapsed. and nobody at that time would have imagined that nato would extend
concerning indiana during a recent trade mission to germany. recently you criticized the way president obama has been handling ukraine, and you offered this suggestion. take a look. >> the continued instability in the middle east and with putin's suppression in ukraine, i believe we must take immediate steps to strengthen our mutual security by deploying a robust muscle defense in all of europe. >> why is the governor of i wanted i understand that component. indiana has a long-standing interest in issues affecting at home and abroad and i thought it was person to speak about the right response to russian aggression in the ukraine. i am pleased to hear there are more sanctions coming, maybe, tomorrow, by the truth is, we need less talk and more deeds. passing and moving rapidly to pass the trans atlantic trade partnership and by deploying a robust missile shield throughout europe, including in poland and the czech republic off line in 2009 by this administration, that would send a very strong message to vladimir putin and to russia that nato countries and the united states are going to respon
line if your attacked by germany and russia, who do you shoot first? the answer was, germany, business before pleasure. not a very nice cold war story. >> ooh! >> that's hard to -- obviously these attitudes go way back and are very deep and action sir bait -- exacerbated by world war ii and nobody has been prepared to tell the entire truth about, forth ruthly in the region so it does have an overhang i think matters quite a lot. it means that the koreans and others are hyper sensitive to what japanese leaders do. it's a factor of unpredictability and volatility when you ad the popular passions that may grow up around particular memories and attitudes, played to by politicians, sometimes unwisely. it's another important factor of volatility. ... >> and you have these kinds of isss in the region, the same is true for korea. issues left over from that( occupation. and these things are in the living memory of the koreans and the japanese, and they're taught in the schools. the japanese don't teach this. and that is something that i personally find deeply disturbing about the government of
. >> you have not confined yourself to issues concerning indiana during a recent trade mission to germany. recently you criticized the way president obama has been handling ukraine, and you offered this suggestion. take a look. >> the continued instability in the middle east and with putin's suppression in ukraine, i believe we must take immediate steps to strengthen our mutual security by deploying a robust muscle defense in all of europe. >> why is the governor of i wanted i understand hoosiers have had a longstanding interest in issues affecting the nation at home and abroad, and i'm no different than that. when i was there, i thought it was important to speak about what i believe would be the right response to russian aggression in ukraine. i'm pleased to hear there's more sanctions maybe coming tomorrow. the truth of the matter is i think we need less talk and more deeds, and by passing and moving rapidly to pass the trans-atlantic trade partnership and, frankly, by deploying a robust missile shield throughout europe, including in poland and the czech republic that was off line in 20
trade mission to germany, recently you criticized the way president obama has been handling ukraine. and you offered this suggestion. take a look. >> but to continued instability in the middle east and with putin's aggression in ukraine, i believe we must take immediate steps to strengthen our mutual security by deploying a robust missile defense in all of europe. >> why is the governor of indiana talking about missile defense and not to get too deeply into it, but how do you think setting up a missile defense in the czech republic or poland is going to stop putin who is not involved with missiles but is talking about sending tanks and airplanes over the border or at least threatening to send those over the border into eastern ukraine? how does missile defense help? >> well, first, i was in germany promoting the state of indiana. we have more than 12,000 hoosiers employed by german companies. and more to come. and hoosiers have had a long standing interest in issues affecting the nation at home and abroad. i'm no different than that. but when i was there, i thought it was important
of the day we need germany with the u.s. working together. because right now the europeans get 50% of their oil from russia. >> germany needs natural gas. >> they're not going to do it. >> at the end of the day, these sanctions to be most powerful have to be collective. the g7 came out with an announcement last night -- i think two nights ago. which looks like there would be an upcoming collective sanction. we need that to be real and to stick. i would challenge whether we see that. >> putin holds a lot of the cards here. >> exactly. >> he controls energy supplies and also supplies of metals. boeing has huge composure in the form of titanium. it doesn't look like the western world will push him very hard. can i talk about another failure? >> real quick. >> the president was in asia, he was in south korea. this doesn't have to deal with economics or business. it sure would have been nice to see him talking about human rights in north korea. the atrocities that are going on in north korea, the president had a chance to talk about that. >> what a point. >> i didn't see anything. >> w
you look at those other countries in terms of minimum wage and things like that, germany has no minimum wage. their unemployment is 8%. france has a big minimum wage and their youth unemployment is 20%. >> we have an experiment here in the united states because each state tries a different pattern. we see illinois and california raising taxes and we see wisconsin and texas lowering regulations and taxes. it's the latter two that are doing better than the former two. >> that's right. the example i think your citing is texas. a lot of the net new job versus been created in texas. >> let's spell it out. one third of all new created over the past ten years have been created in texas and they have been dramatically lowering regulations in texas. >> plus the legislature in the state meets every other year. that's a great idea. and also add to the list that steve rightfully put forgot. >> he cut taxes in half. he cut government spending in half and the economy, boom, grew 7% a year under calvin coolidge. tell me which hike creates a middle class job and the interesting statistic. >>
wife's tale is so. germany last year they brain scan may lucid dreamer and he controlled the direction of history and was followed up with an mri scan. it is absolutely true. so maybe one day leonardo dicaprio smithian section is not so far-fetched after all. and then, the big web. mental illness. this is why president barack obama and the european union want to dump a billion dollars to find out how the brain is miswired. it turns out, for example, many of our leading figures, actors, actress is, proposers coming musicians have suffered from bipolar disorder. on the upper left of the forks in total, as margot kidder. she became famous as lois lane. however, several years ago they found her homeless, stark, hiding the hon garbage cans and it was revealed that she suffers from bipolar is. many actresses and famous actors suffer. we can now bring in these people and we now cannot cure them, but we understand how mental illness forms to a degree. schizophrenics, for example, hear voices. if you want to see a schizophrenic, just go downtown, see the homeless and you'll see people talking t
the hearts of men. >> solar number is grown up. it's still got a long way to go. >> germany ranks number one for using the most solar energy, and the u.s. number four. >>> a waiter needs good coordinationing speed and buenos aires puts its waiters to the test. daniel schweimler reports on the art of waiting tables. >> reporter: efficiency, poise and grace are three of the virtuous required. they were all on display at the 10th annual race for waiters and waite reses in the heart of buenos aires. >> dante is a previous winner, with more than 30 years in the job, he knows what is required. >> translation: a good waiter must be friendly, respond rapidly and treat the customers as well as possible, always with a smile they are the main characteristics of a good waiter. >> he's worked at the bar in the legal district serving lawyers and judges for two decades, a profession he loves, because he numbers dealing with the public. an often mallined profession. some practice it with a certain alt of style -- amount of style and pan ash. nowhere is the art of waiting a table better preserved than here i
of the dignitaries from southern germany, which would be very catholic. you've also got parts of england, ireland, all of those countries. of course, latin america. the gentleman standing behind pope francis is archbishop gainsfind. he was the assistant to pope benedict as well and elevated to archbishop. now he's the assistant to pope francis, and so when you see pope francis at a public event, you'll see archbishop gainsfind. if you see pope benedict at an event, which i did in january, archbishop gainsfind is there. he's the go-between. once you know him, you know both popes. >> this ceremony got started at 10:00 local time and lasted two hours there. pope francis is going down and doing what he's doing, shaking every day people's hands. when he became pope, wearing the wooden cross. what sticks out to you in the ceremony today as you've been watching the last couple hours? >> what sticks out to me is how formal it is. pope francis is keeping this warm right now. i don't think we'll see him do any selfies today. i don't think that's part of the program. but i do think you'll see, what you won'
it makes between jews in nazi germany and the current one percent. here in the bay area, tom's comments on income inequality feel particularly relevant given the current tensions ruling among san franciscans and what is known as the techie community. without any further introduction, please join me in welcoming tom perkins. [applause] i want to start at the very top which is to ask you what the catalyst was for your writing this short letter to the wall street journal. frustrations had been building up for along time about what i see as the demonization of the rich. it was particularly nasty attack triggeredife, which my response. i thought being a norwegian night i should write to her defense. i spilled a little more blood than i had planned, but i'm not sorry didn't. >> i should point out that your wife is in the front row of editorial this evening. you refer to an attack on her. explain. whose attack was at? spend a lot of time on this. over the years, the seven cisco francisco-- the san chronicle has had a series of attacks on her. , she'sof these attacks number one bestseller on ev
on the planet. and a new exhibit of art, banned by nazi germany. >> to actually see the art that was deemed as un-german is fascinating. >> rose: we have those stories and more on what happened and what might happen. >> there's a saying around here: you stand behind what you say. around here, we don't make excuses, we make commitments. and when you can't live up to them, you own up and make it right. some people think the kind of
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